Coffee and Tea

At Southern Season we offer the largest selection of coffee beans in the Charleston market. Our coffee beans have been hand-selected by professional tasters, who select for us only the best beans from the best organic growers in all regions of the world. The beans have been roasted in small batches by the best local and regional roasters and are the freshest beans on the marketplace, delivered immediately to us for your enjoyment. We guarantee the freshest, fullest flavored coffee available in the Charleston marketplace. 

Our specialty coffees are sure to satisfy every appetite, while our selection of rare, loose-leaf fine teas offers the enthusiast a wealth of opportunities to expand or refine their palate. Our educated staff is available to provide you with an expert knowledge on all varieties. Sip and sample while meandering among a vast array of coffee and tea-brewing equipment.

Coffee & Tea Bar

Whether it’s a quick java fix or a leisurely cup of tea while strolling through the store, Southern Season’s Coffee and Tea Bar offers an elegant hand-brewed touch on everything from the everyday blends to the exotic choices. Dozens of coffee and tea varieties available on the menu are bolstered by the option to choose from our store’s assortment, leaving no craving outside satisfaction’s reach. 

 

All About Tea / Brewing Tips: 

Black Tea

Black teas are the teas with which we are most familiar. They are fully oxidized and hence are typically the most robust and heartiest of teas, taking milk and sugar well. Body and flavor range from earthy and deep to fruity.

Brewing Tips for Black Tea:

  1. Bring freshly drawn filtered water to a boil.
  2. Pour into teapot or mug and swirl to pre-warm, then discard.
  3. Use water just off the boil, 195-200°F.
  4. Use 1 teaspoon leaves per 6 ounces water.
  5. Pour water over the leaves, cover and steep for 3-1/2 to 5 minutes.
  6. Remove leaves and serve.

Multiple infusions of the same leaves will provide changing body and flavor characteristics. Increased steeping time for each infusion will assure optimal flavor.

Experiment and enjoy!

Green Tea

Green tea is produced from Camellia sinensis and is minimally processed before drying. The leaves are plucked, withered, then steamed or fired, and dried. Chinese green teas tend to have fruity or floral flavors, and are fired after withering, while Japanese green teas are steamed and tend to be more vegetal and reminiscent of the sea air in which they are grown.

Brewing Tips for Green Tea:

  1. Bring freshly drawn filtered water to a boil.
  2. Pour into teapot or mug and swirl to pre-warm, then discard.
  3. Let water cool to 175-185°F for Chinese green teas or 145-175°F for Japanese green teas.
  4. Use 1 teaspoon leaves per 6 ounces water.
  5. Pour water over leaves, cover and steep for 1–3 minutes.
  6. Remove leaves and serve.

Multiple infusions of the same leaves will reveal changing body and flavor characteristics. Increased steeping time for each infusion assures optimal flavor.

Experiment and enjoy!

White Tea

White tea is the rarest of all teas, once drunk only by royalty. Hand-picked from Camellia sinensis only in the early spring, the unopened buds and select leaves are withered, steamed, and then dried. Due to the youth of its leaves and minimal processing, white tea is naturally low in caffeine and has high levels of antioxidants compared to more mature tea leaves. White tea is generally light bodied, with delicately sweet, floral flavors, and vibrant aromas.

Brewing Tips for White Tea:

  1. Bring freshly drawn filtered water to a boil.
  2. Pour into teapot or mug and swirl to pre-warm, then discard.
  3. Let water cool to 175-185°F.
  4. Use 1 teaspoon leaves per 6 ounces water.
  5. Pour water over the leaves, cover and steep for 2-5 minutes.
  6. Remove leaves and serve.

Multiple infusions of the same leaves will reveal changing body and flavor characteristics. Increased steeping time for each infusion assures optimal flavor.

Experiment and enjoy!

Oolong Tea

Oolong teas are partially oxidized and generally more processed than green teas, but less processed than black teas; they can be from 20-80% oxidized and hence offer tremendous variety. A less oxidized, greener oolong produces a sweeter, lighter, and more floral tea, whereas a more oxidized, darker oolong produces a more robust, toastier, and fruitier tea. Oolong tea leaves reveal hidden flavor notes with multiple infusions of the same leaves.

Brewing Tips for Oolong Tea:

  1. Bring freshly drawn filtered water to a boil.
  2. Pour into teapot or mug and swirl to pre-warm, then discard.
  3. Let water cool to 180° -195°F.
  4. Use 1 teaspoon “rolled” oolong or 2 tsp curled and twisted* oolong per 6 ounces water.
  5. Pour water over the leaves, cover and steep for 2-5 minutes.
  6. Remove leaves and serve.

*Curled and twisted oolongs may require more leaf per cup because of their leaf size.

Multiple infusions of the same leaves will reveal changing body and flavor characteristics. Increased steeping time for each infusion assures optimal flavor.

Experiment and enjoy!

Pu-erh Tea

Pu-erh teas leaves are fermented and matured from a few days to a few decades. Like fine wines, they can refine with age. They have very deep, earthy flavors and are often malty, mellow, and floral. Pu-erh teas are excellent digestives and have widely acclaimed medicinal benefits.

Brewing Tips for Pu-erh Tea:

  1. Bring freshly drawn filtered water to a boil.
  2. Pour into teapot or mug and swirl to pre-warm, then discard.
  3. Use water just off the boil, 195-210°F.
  4. For open leaf style Pu-erh, use 1 tsp of tea per 6 ounces of water. Individual Tuo Chas (tea compressed into a nest shape and wrapped) vary from cup- to pot-sized, so use accordingly.
  5. Pour water over the leaves, cover and steep for 3-5 minutes.
  6. Remove leaves and serve.

Pu-erh teas may provide multiple infusions. Increased steeping time for each additional cup or pot assures optimal flavor.

Experiment and enjoy!

Herbal Tisanes

Herbal “teas” such as chamomile, rooibos, or mint are not true teas. Tisane is the term used to denote an infusion of leaves, fruit, flowers, etc. from plants other than Camellia sinensis. These tisanes have a rich history of medicinal uses worldwide, though specific claims are considered anecdotal and remain controversial. They are generally enjoyed for their good flavor and general healthfulness.

Brewing Tips for Tisanes:

  1. Bring freshly drawn filtered water to a boil.
  2. Pour into teapot or mug and swirl to pre-warm, then discard.
  3. Use water just off the boil, 195-210°F.
  4. Use roughly 1 rounded teaspoon of tea per 6 ounces of water.
  5. Pour water over the leaves, cover and steep for 4-7 minutes.
  6. Remove leaves and serve.

Tisanes are generally best in one infusion.

Enjoy!